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Drivewise® From Allstate

DRIVE SAFELY AND SEE HOW MUCH YOU CAN SAVE.

With Drivewise, you can save for safe driving and receive personalized driving insights. We’ll reward you with savings just for activating Drivewise in the Allstate® mobile app and continue to reward you with a policy credit every six months for safe driving. It’s simple: safe speeds, safe stops and safe driving hours can help drive your insurance costs down. Download the Allstate® mobile app to get started.

Drivewise is a program from Allstate that measures your safe driving behaviors and rewards you for them. You can save by getting rewarded just for participating and driving safe — the safer you drive, the more you can earn. Drivewise is a free feature available with all auto policies that provides feedback on driving behaviors to give customers personalized, real-time insights into how they can drive more safely. Drivewise is available to customers in 49 states and new and existing customers can enroll in Drivewise through the Allstate® mobile app.

DASHBOARD: Quickly see how much your safe driving has earned you. Illustration of bar graph.

DRIVING INSIGHTS:  Get family driving insights and real-time audible alerts. Illustration of tow truck with car.

CRASH DETECTION: A safety feature that can get you in touch with help if you’re in a crash. Illustration of document with locaton pin points.

MY TRIPS: Get personalized feedback and review your driving behavior. Illustration of foot pressing brake pedal.

MY CHALLENGES: Complete safe-driving challenges to earn Allstate Rewards® points. Illustration of phone with finger swiping.

PHONE ACTIVITY: See how often you use your phone behind the wheel.

The Allstate® mobile app automatically detects a trip is occurring when:

  • The phone is on with location services enabled and adequately charged—at least 5% battery power
  • iOS: Allow Motion & Fitness and set Location to Always with Precise Location enabled
  • Android: Allow Physical Activity, set Location to Always and turn off Power savings mode (for OS 12, confirm Precise Location is set to On)
  • A vehicle travels at least 15 mph for at least 1 minute – E.g. a drive from home to the local supermarket

No action is necessary on your part to capture a trip. Even if the app is closed in the background, it will detect trips as long as you are in an area with adequate cellular service.

If a crash* is detected, you’ll receive an immediate app notification offering you help.

Press and hold the notification, or tap it to access these help options:

  1. Call 911
  2. Request roadside assistance
  3. Tell us you’re okay or it was a false alarm
  4. Start a claim

*A crash is considered a collision that involves a car moving at 25 mph or greater.

 

Get Crash Detection with Drivewise in a few simple steps.

  1. Open the Allstate Mobile App
  2. Go to the Drivewise dashboard
  3. Go to settings
  4. Turn on crash detection

That’s it. You’re on your way to getting the help you need, when you need it most.

 

  1. Open the Allstate® mobile app.
    Don’t have the app? Text ALLSTATEAPP to 25788 to get a link to download.
  2. Log in using your My Account ID and follow the prompts.
  3. Take a drive and watch your savings add up!

Drive with quality coverage on your side. Allstate auto insurance can help you stay protected on the road. 

Start your quote today!

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Whether you're shopping for a home, a car, or planning for retirement, these calculators can help you weigh the financial implications of your options.

Insurance Videos

Get to know the different types of insurance policies and what they help cover. These short videos help explain insurance terms like deductibles, limits and more in simple terms.

Why Do I Need Homeowners Insurance?

Whether you’re buying a new home or you’ve already paid off the mortgage, you may have wondered about the value of home insurance. Your home is likely one of the most valuable assets you have. Homeowners insurance helps protect that investment — and you — in a variety of ways.

Here are some of the key reasons it’s important to consider having homeowners insurance.

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In some cases, homeowners insurance is required. For example, if you have a mortgage, your lender is most likely going to require that you have homeowners insurance, says the Insurance Information Institute (III). Before funding your mortgage or refinancing, the mortgage company will typically ask you to provide proof that your home is adequately insured. That’s because the lender wants to be sure its financial investment in your home is protected if it’s damaged or destroyed by a fire or other certain risks.

In addition to home insurance, other types of insurance may be required by mortgage companies. These different insurance requirements may be based on where your home is located. For example, if your home is located in a high-risk flood zone, you may have to have flood insurance.

If you don’t have a homeowners insurance policy, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau states that your lender is allowed to buy insurance and charge you for the cost. Keep in mind, however, that the insurance policy the lender obtains may be more expensive than what you can purchase on your own and may offer more limited coverage.

Read more: How Much Does Homeowners Insurance Cost?

While a standard homeowners policy helps protect your house, it typically helps cover more than just the physical structure of your home. From your personal belongings to the shed in your backyard, or even medical bills if a guest is injured on your property, a standard homeowners insurance policy may include the following coverages:

  • Dwelling coverage.
    If your home and any attached structures, like a deck or garage, are damaged by a covered peril, dwelling coverage helps pay for repairs. The amount of dwelling coverage you need is usually calculated by the square footage of your house and what it would cost to rebuild your home. This is not necessarily the market value of your home.
  • Other structures coverage.
    The other structures coverage in your policy helps pay for repairs or replacement for detached structures on your property, like a fence or shed, if they are damaged or destroyed by a covered peril.
  • Personal property coverage.
    Personal property coverage helps pay to replace certain belongings, such as furniture and electronics, that are stolen or damaged by a covered loss.
  • Personal liability coverage.
    If you or a family member are found legally responsible for accidentally damaging someone else’s property or injuring someone, liability coverage may help pay for related repair costs and legal fees, in addition to helping with medical bills.
  • Guest medical protection.
    If a visitor is accidentally injured at your home, your policy’s guest medical protection helps pay for their resulting medical bills.
  • Additional living expenses coverage.
    If you cannot stay in your home after a fire or other covered claim, your homeowners insurance coverage may help pay for temporary living costs, such as hotel bills.

It’s important to keep in mind that coverages come with limits — the maximum amount your insurance policy will pay toward a covered claim. When selecting your coverage limits, be sure to consider things like the potential cost of rebuilding your home or replacing your belongings. That way, you can be better prepared if your home or belongings are damaged or destroyed by a fire or other covered peril.

Remember that many coverages have deductibles, as well. A deductible is the amount you must pay before your insurance benefits kick in to help reimburse you for a covered claim.

Having a homeowners insurance policy won’t prevent damage to your home or belongings, but it may help provide a financial safety net if the unexpected occurs.

Updated: December 2021

What Perils Are Covered By A Homeowners Insurance Policy?

A peril is an event, like a fire or break-in, that may damage your home or belongings. The perils covered by your homeowners insurance are listed in your policy. The list of mishaps you’re protected against (“perils” in industry speak) is actually pretty broad. Here’s a look at what the Insurance Information Institute says are some of the most common perils covered by a typical homeowners insurance policy:

  • Fire and smoke
  • Lightning strikes
  • Windstorms and hail
  • Explosion Vandalism and malicious mischief
  • Damage from an aircraft, car or vehicle
  • Theft Falling objects Weight of ice, snow or sleet Water damage

Check your homeowners insurance policy to learn what perils it covers.

A home, belongings and structures like a garage or shed are all usually covered for fire damage (including smoke damage). If the condition of the home requires its residents to live elsewhere for a time, a policy will typically help reimburse for those expenses as well.

Damage from lightning is typically covered by homeowners insurance. Some policies will also extend that protection to power surges that happen as a result of a strike, covering, for instance, damaged electronics.

Wind damage — even when it’s from a tornado — is normally a covered peril. Protection usually also includes hail damage, or wind-driven rain or snow that gets inside after a home has been damaged by a storm. Read your policy, though, to learn of any exclusions.

The good news is that you don’t permanently lose your benefits if they’re reduced. Instead, your payment amount is recalculated so that you receive the withheld money once you’ve reached full retirement age, notes the SSA. It’s another way working in retirement may help stretch out your income over time.

Whether it’s from an aerosol can or a propane grill, it’s never good when something explodes in or around a home. Damage resulting from such explosions is usually covered by homeowners insurance.

Homeowners insurance typically covers damage that results from such acts. That would include repairing or rebuilding your home, or replacing your possessions if they were damaged by the event.

It may not be often that a plane or car crashes into a home, but when it happens, the images can be pretty dramatic. The good news is that most homeowners policies help pay to repair damage resulting from such an event.

After you die, your spouse will get your monthly benefit check or hers — whichever is more. And if you have disabled children, kids under age 19, or elderly parents who depend on you for at least half their income, they could receive “survivor benefits,” according to the SSA.

You probably don’t expect an accident to occur. But, if your child throws a ball through a neighbor’s window or you’re held responsible for medical bills after a guest trips and falls in your rented home or apartment, for example, liability coverage may help cover the costs.

Similar to other coverages, limits apply to the amount your insurance policy pays out after a covered loss. Read your policy to understand how much coverage it provides and make sure it fits your needs. Your insurance agent can help you adjust the limits if you decide you may benefit from additional coverage

If an intruder breaks a window or door to gain access to your home, insurance will likely cover the damage. Items that are actually stolen are generally also protected by the personal property coverage that’s part of most homeowners insurance policies. But you should know that most policies have limits on how much they’ll pay out for specific types of personal property. You may be able to purchase additional coverage for those items.

If your home is damaged by a falling object, whether it’s a meteor or a healthy tree that topples in a storm, homeowners insurance may help pay for the damage.

When the weight of heavy, wet snow or ice causes your roof to cave in, you’ll find that your homeowners insurance will typically help cover the loss — for the damage to your home and your property inside.

Most homeowners policies will cover water damage from burst pipes or water heaters when the cause is sudden and accidental (but not the damage to the pipe or water heater if they burst because of defect or wear and tear). So, if your water heater bursts and soaks your drywall, you’re likely protected from the water damage. Water damage from a flood requires a separate flood insurance policy. Water damage from water backup from sewers or drains or overflow of water from a sump pump typically requires additional optional coverage.

A homeowners insurance policy may help cover damage resulting from a number of incidents, but likely also comes with a list of scenarios that it won’t cover. Also, remember that coverage limits and deductibles will apply. Get informed about the specifics of your coverage by reviewing your policy, or call your agent with questions.

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How Much Does Homeowners Insurance Cost?

How much is homeowners insurance going to cost me? When you buy a new home, this may be one of the first questions that pops into your mind. And it’s an important question, especially if you’re trying to budget your living expenses. The short answer to that question is: It depends. These are some of the factors that may help determine how much you’ll end up paying for homeowners insurance:

  • The deductible you choose.
  • The value of your home and belongings.
  • Your insurance claim history.
  • Other variables, such as the age and location of your home.

Watch the video below to learn more about the factors that may affect the cost of homeowners insurance.

 
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The types and amount of coverage you need depend on a number of factors. These include your home’s location, size and amenities. There’s no single “rule of thumb” that works for everyone.

Also, how much you pay for your house may not be a key part of the insurance equation. The formula for determining adequate insurance takes many other things into consideration.

Geographic location often affects the type of risks your home is exposed to. For instance, if you own a home in Miami, you may want different insurance coverage limits than those set by the owner of the exact same home in Boston. Why? Dwelling coverage limits are based on replacement cost, which can vary by location due to different construction or material costs in each area.

Another factor is the cost of labor and materials in different geographic areas. Since homeowners insurance typically helps cover the cost of repairing or rebuilding a home if it’s damaged or destroyed by a covered peril, the amount of insurance you may need partly depends on what it would cost to complete the work in your town. Labor costs, in particular, vary significantly in different markets.

And why wouldn’t you simply choose dwelling coverage limits that match the purchase price of your house? The actual cost to repair or rebuild your home could end up being less than what you paid. Or, in some cases, it could actually be more costly to rebuild your home.

Does your home sport a custom tile roof? That may cost more to repair or replace than a house with a standard asphalt roof in the event of damage from hail or another covered peril. The same is true of interior details: Things like crown moldings, hardwood floors, a gourmet kitchen with granite counters or a spa-quality bathroom need to be factored in when determining the appropriate amount of insurance for your home.

The good news is that you don’t permanently lose your benefits if they’re reduced. Instead, your payment amount is recalculated so that you receive the withheld money once you’ve reached full retirement age, notes the SSA. It’s another way working in retirement may help stretch out your income over time.

When choosing coverage limits, you’ll likely want to consider items like a pool, shed, fences and other structures on your land that could potentially sustain damage so you can make sure your coverage limits meet your needs.

Personal property coverage is part of a standard homeowners insurance policy. If your clothes, appliances, electronics, furniture and other items are damaged, stolen or destroyed during a covered event like a break-in or severe storm, this coverage may pay to repair or replace them.

Generally, personal property coverage is set at a percentage of your home’s “dwelling” coverage limit. However, this is an area you may be able to lower if you know you have less valuable belongings and want to lower your insurance costs.

Keep in mind you may want to purchase scheduled personal property for more expensive items such as jewelry, art and collectibles to make sure your limits are high enough for these items.

Many homeowners insurance policies include $100,000 in liability coverage, as well as some coverage for medical payments. Liability coverage may help pay for legal expenses and other costs if you were sued by someone who was accidentally injured on your property and later found legally responsible for their damages.

 

In some cases you may want to increase your liability coverage. If you have a lot of assets, you could, unfortunately, be a target for lawsuits simply because people assume you have money to pay for damages. Another reason you may want to consider increasing your liability limit is if you have a backyard pool or trampoline because those types of items may increase the risk that a visitor is injured at your home.

 

It’s fairly inexpensive to increase liability coverage on your homeowner’s policy. For even greater liability protection, you may want to consider purchasing a personal umbrella policy. Umbrella coverage typically offers at least a $1 million limit and kicks in after the limits of your homeowner’s policy are exhausted.

One factor that determines how much you pay for homeowners insurance is the deductible, which is your share of a covered claim.

You can typically select the deductible for your property coverage in your homeowners policy. For example, you could choose a $1,000 deductible that would apply to your dwelling coverage, other structures coverage and your personal property coverage.

If you choose a higher deductible, the annual premium for your insurance policy will likely be lower. The downside? If you have to make a claim for repairs to your home, you’ll be required to shell out more money before your insurance helps cover the cost of repairs. On the other hand, choosing a low deductible could increase your premium, but you will pay a smaller amount when you file a claim.

Your homeowners insurance premiums are also tied to how much coverage you purchase. If you’re buying an insurance policy to cover a home that’s worth $250,000, you’re going to pay more than someone whose home is worth half that amount.

Your insurer can suggest appropriate dwelling coverage limits based on the type of home you’re insuring and the materials it’s made of. You may also be able to buy additional dwelling coverage, up to a certain amount. It’s important to understand that your dwelling coverage limit is meant to help pay to completely rebuild your home if it’s destroyed by a covered peril. So, you may not be able to purchase dwelling coverage with limits lower than what your home is worth. The Insurance Information Institute (III) also suggests that homeowners take inflation into account when choosing their coverage limits. For example, your home may be worth $300,000 today, but if you had to rebuild it after a covered loss in 5 years, it may cost $325,000 to rebuild. Be sure to ask your insurance agent about inflation guards when purchasing a policy.

The amount of personal property coverage you buy affects the premium for your homeowners insurance policy. Homeowners insurance usually includes personal property coverage, which helps pay to repair or replace your belongings if you experience a covered loss. Say your belongings are worth $50,000. You’ll want to ensure that you buy enough personal property coverage to replace all of your personal items if they’re damaged or destroyed. Otherwise, if a disaster strikes, you may not receive enough money to replace all of your stuff. However, keep in mind that the more coverage you buy, the more expensive your policy premium will be. Be sure to document and create an inventory of all your items to help ensure you purchase enough coverage.

The rate you pay for homeowners coverage can be affected by your insurance claim history. Homeowners who have had fewer claims typically pay less for insurance than those who have filed more claims.

Many factors may affect the cost of your homeowners insurance policy. Here are some of the factors that may affect how much you pay for home insurance, according to the III:

  • The age of your home
  • Condition of the roof
  • Where you live
  • Your home’s features (such as a swimming pool or fence)

When you’re shopping for homeowners insurance, it helps to understand how the coverages, coverage limits and deductibles you choose affect the cost of a policy. It’s a good idea to talk to a local insurance agent if you need help understanding a home insurance quote or your current home insurance coverage.



5 Things To Know About Social Security

When it comes to something as important as Social Security, it’s good to know you’re getting as much from it as possible. 

Here are five things to remember:

You can start receiving Social Security payments as soon as you turn 62, but your benefits may be reduced 20 to 30 percent, according to the United States Social Security Administration (SSA). That’s a lot, especially if you expect to spend many years in retirement. You may want to think about working a bit longer or relying on your retirement savings to help cover your living expenses until you can receive full benefits.

This chart from the SSA lists the full retirement age at which you may be entitled to receive full Social Security retirement benefits: 

If you were born in…It’s…
1937 or earlier65
193865 + 2 months
193965 + 4 months
194065 + 6 months
194165 + 8 months
194265 + 10 months
1943-195466
195566 + 2 months
195666 + 4 months
195766 + 6 months
195866 + 8 months
195966 + 10 months
1960 or later67

As long as you’re 62, you have the option to take Social Security, says the SSA. The SSA sets yearly earnings limits — if you’re receiving Social Security benefits before your full retirement age and earn more than the limit, your benefit payments will be temporarily lowered based on how much you earn. Say you earn $10,000 over the limit. Your benefits would be reduced by $5,000. If you make $20,000 over the limit, they would be reduced by $10,000.

The good news is that you don’t permanently lose your benefits if they’re reduced. Instead, your payment amount is recalculated so that you receive the withheld money once you’ve reached full retirement age, notes the SSA. It’s another way working in retirement may help stretch out your income over time.

When you’re ready to start receiving monthly benefits, you must apply for them with the SSA. You can do that over the phone (1-800-772-1213), in person, or via the SSA’s online application.

Some Social Security beneficiaries end up paying taxes on their benefits, according to the SSA. It all depends on the earnings listed on your income tax return. If you file with more than $25,000 as an individual (or $32,000 jointly), you’ll have to pay federal income taxes on your benefits, according the SSA. The rules for state income taxes vary from state to state.

Let’s say your monthly benefits turn out to be more than your spouse’s. It’s a common scenario, especially in families where one spouse paused their career to stay home with the kids. In cases like this, the SSA says your spouse may be eligible for an additional benefit — up to one-half of your full retirement amount.

After you die, your spouse will get your monthly benefit check or hers — whichever is more. And if you have disabled children, kids under age 19, or elderly parents who depend on you for at least half their income, they could receive “survivor benefits,” according to the SSA.

You probably don’t expect an accident to occur. But, if your child throws a ball through a neighbor’s window or you’re held responsible for medical bills after a guest trips and falls in your rented home or apartment, for example, liability coverage may help cover the costs.

Similar to other coverages, limits apply to the amount your insurance policy pays out after a covered loss. Read your policy to understand how much coverage it provides and make sure it fits your needs. Your insurance agent can help you adjust the limits if you decide you may benefit from additional coverage

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What Is Renters Insurance?

 A renters insurance policy is a group of coverages designed to help protect renters living in a house or apartment. A typical renters insurance policy includes three types of coverage that help protect you, your belongings and your living arrangements after a covered loss. Read on to learn how each type of coverage works.

Renters insurance (sometimes referred to as “tenant insurance”) helps cover unexpected events — otherwise known as covered perils. You may not always be able to prevent certain situations, such as theft, a break-in or a visitor’s injury, and that’s where renters insurance comes in. This table breaks down the different types of coverages in a renters insurance policy and what they usually cover.

 

Personal property coverage, a standard component of renters insurance, may help cover the cost of replacing your stuff if it’s unexpectedly damaged or destroyed. This protection generally applies to certain risks (also referred to as “perils”), such as fire, according to the Insurance Information Institute. For example, if your furniture and clothing are destroyed by a fire, this coverage may help you pay for the cost of replacing them. However, remember that coverage limits — the maximum amount your policy will pay for personal property losses — will apply.

If your renters insurance policy includes personal property coverage, it may help pay to replace your stolen items. This coverage typically protects items stolen after a break-in at your rental property, or even items stolen outside of your rental. For example, if your personal property (such as a gaming system) is stolen from your car, the personal property coverage in your renters policy may help pay to replace it.

 

Keep in mind that personal property coverage is usually subject to a deductible. This means you’d have to pay a certain amount of money toward the covered item’s repair or replacement before your insurer will help pay for the loss.

Be sure to read your insurance policy carefully to understand what may or may not be covered.

Think of everything you own. The value of your belongings can quickly add up. How much would it take to replace them if they were damaged or destroyed?

When purchasing a renters insurance policy, you may have a few different choices when it comes to selecting personal property coverage. Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • You’ll want to set coverage limits that are appropriate for your situation. Creating an inventory of the belongings you store in your apartment or home may help you assess the value of your things so you can decide how much personal property coverage is right for you.
  • You may also have to decide what kind of personal property coverage to purchase. A policy that provides actual cash value protection typically covers belongings up to their current market value (taking depreciation into account). A policy that includes replacement cost coverage may help you pay to replace your items at today’s retail prices after a covered loss.

Personal property coverage may not help protect everything you own. Certain types of belongings, such as jewelry or a coin collection, have limited coverage under a standard renters insurance policy. You may be able to add additional coverage, called scheduled personal property coverage, to your policy to help protect your valuables. A local insurance agent can help you determine whether this coverage makes sense for your situation.

Liability coverage is another protection typically included in a renters insurance policy. This coverage may help protect you from paying out of pocket for certain costs if you are found legally responsible for injuries to other people or damage to their property.

You probably don’t expect an accident to occur. But, if your child throws a ball through a neighbor’s window or you’re held responsible for medical bills after a guest trips and falls in your rented home or apartment, for example, liability coverage may help cover the costs.

Similar to other coverages, limits apply to the amount your insurance policy pays out after a covered loss. Read your policy to understand how much coverage it provides and make sure it fits your needs. Your insurance agent can help you adjust the limits if you decide you may benefit from additional coverage

If you’re renting a house or apartment, you typically have a place to call home until your lease expires. But what if your rented home is damaged by fire, for instance, and you’re unable to live in it? That’s where renters insurance may help.

Renters insurance usually includes coverage for additional living expenses. This coverage helps pay for additional costs you incur because you are unable to live in the home you’re renting after a covered loss. Covered costs may include hotel bills or additional food expenditures that are above the amount you would typically spend. Check your policy to learn how much coverage you have in place for additional living expenses and to review the risks your policy may cover.

If you need to file a renters insurance claim, here are some tips to remember to help you through the process. However, keep in mind that your claims process may vary depending on the extent of damage.

  • Contact your insurance agent as soon as possible to report the claim.
  • Protect your items from further damage. Talk to your agent about any emergency repairs that may be needed.
  • Your agent will ask questions about the damage and answer any questions you may have about the process.
  • Discuss your policy’s coverage and limits with your agent to understand what applies to your situation.
  • Document damaged items in writing, and take photos or videos of the damage, before repair work begins.

Before renters insurance helps pay for a covered loss, you’ll likely need to pay a deductible. The amount of your deductible is often tied to your policy’s premium (the amount you pay your insurance company to keep your policy in force). You’ll typically find that the lower your premium, the more your deductible may be for each covered loss. Your deductible and premium are listed in your policy and can usually be adjusted based on your budget and needs.

While renters insurance helps protect you and your belongings, keep in mind that it typically does not cover the physical building you’re living in. Landlord insurance is designed to help protect the owner’s dwelling, while you, the renter, are usually responsible for protecting the belongings you keep inside. Similarly, while landlord insurance may offer liability protection for the policyholder, that protection typically does not extend to tenants. You can find answers to some more frequently asked questions about renters insurance here.

 
 
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